The KPMG/Association of Run-Off Companies Run-Off Survey 2005 put the UK non-life run-off market at £38.4bn, or 23% of the total non-life liabilities, and the life run-off market at £135bn, representing 14% of the total UK life market.

The KPMG/Association of Run-Off Companies Run-Off Survey 2005 put the UK non-life run-off market at £38.4bn, or 23% of the total non-life liabilities, and the life run-off market at £135bn, representing 14% of the total UK life market. The total liabilities of Lloyd's run-off syndicates were £7.2bn, a figure now greater than that of Equitas, the company set up to deal with Lloyd's 1992 and prior run-off business.

Very little is known about the size of the non-UK run-off markets, but the US is likely to be the largest (with an estimated 41% of global reserves according to GE Insurance Solutions), with Europe coming in third after the London market. In Europe, many companies have in the past actively avoided publicising information about the parts of their organisations that have become discontinued, but this is now starting to change. Run-off as a concept has become more widely accepted.

The UK run-off market took off in the late 1980s, marking the end of the London market's underwriting heyday of 1960-1985. When this "boom" turned to bust, the run-off market was effectively born. A great deal has happened in the last 15 years, and yet some old issues remain. All the signs suggest that growth for the run-off sector will continue, as will the amount of management attention and resources dedicated to this area as a result.